Jordan Xidas Drops EDM-laced “Crush”

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A breakaway from the the Southern city’s twangy country music majority, Nashville’s own Jordan Xidas not only offers a pop alternative, but operates with smooth, clean vocals that sound unusually sleek when paired with electronic-dance production. With the release of “Break My Heart” in 2015, the 19-year-old Belmont U. student has gained attention on SoundCloud, iTunes, and Spotify.

His new song sounds just like a new crush feels: dizzy, light,and shyly addictive. It’s got the anthemic appeal of a DJ Snake dance cut; bouncy snares and distant synths, with a pop-y hook that doesn’t let go; (“I think I got a crush on you, I think I think too much, I do/ Can’t keep it on the hush, try to…”).

Buy “Crush” on iTunes here; listen on SoundCloud below.

Charlie Puth just put out the coldest blowoff track of 2017…

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Up until now, Charlie Puth has typically been tagged a ballad boy. With lovey tracks like the Selena Gomez-collaboration “We Don’t Talk Anymore”, sleek “Marvin Gaye”, and “One Call Away”, the 25-year-old’s discography has kept strong ties to innocent, undying adolescent mush. So when the singer dropped “Attention” on iTunes last week, a seething and side-eyed tribute to an insecure ex…(Bella Thorne, are you out there?), our jaws dropped. Originally generated as a homemade, beatboxed voice note on Charlie’s phone while on tour in Tokyo, the bass line for “Attention” is the heart and soul of the track—the relentless source of funk that fuels Puth’s distaste—and our absolute ear-addiction. The visuals are just as cool; Charlie circles clubby LA scenes while an unnamed, chic-but-crazy blonde ex follows his every move. And with nothing but a face-palm and pity, he responds with the track’s apathetic hook: [“You just want attention, you don’t want my heart, maybe you just hate the thought of me with someone new/ you just want attention, I knew from the start, you’re just making sure I’m never gettin’ over you…”].

They really do always come back.

Download on iTunes here; check out the vid below.

‘ANOTHA ONE’…(of Drake’s Tracks Sprung a Leak)

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The fourth track in a slew of accidentally-released predecessors, [Drizzy’s hand at a Jackson Browne voiceover (“These Days“) and a tropical, Popcaan masterpiece collab (“Controlla“) to name a few] this week’s two, pre-Views leaks are sponsored by OVO labelmate and fellow gloom’n’b-er PARTYNEXTDOOR (“Tell Me”), as well as a posthumous Pimp C donation (“Faithful”).

“Tell Me” is crafted for the 2 AM listening session that ends in spilled teardrops on the steering wheel and an absolutely Drakey kind of self-absorption. Running at 3:45, the synthed-out track drowns in 808s and duets PND echoes with soft crooning from the king himself. Cop it here.

Faithful” intros with haunting bars from the late Pimp C, the essence of the song Drake’s soft appeal for commitment: (“‘Fore you say you need somebody, get all your affairs in order/ I won’t have affairs, I’m yours, girl…”). It’s unashamedly moody, an almost smirking, ‘get-me-while-you-can’ wield of Marvins Room-esque emotion that’s likely been the 29-year-old’s most potent weapon for the last eight years.

Listen to these tracks fast, for any precious Drake streaming links left are evaporating faster than whatever support Donald Trump ever had. Although Views From the 6 has not yet been given a due date, the EP is expected sometime this month. (Hold on tight.)

https://soundcloud.com/daysafterx/partynextdoor-tell-me

Majid Jordan Drops “Day and Night”, Confirms 2/5 Album Date

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The OVO-labeled dance-pop duo just dropped yet another gem from their upcoming, self-titled project–expected February 5th next week.

Clinging to their trend of slick, loungey ambience, “Day and Night” is a drum ‘n’ synth-driven cut, mashed with fluttery keyboards that provide the completion–not competition–to Majid Al Maskati’s cooing vocals and cerebral hook: (“But here, as we speak, I feel madness subside/ You know how to ease my mind…”). The track lies in the wondrous realm of late night highway drives and heavy contemplation–like most of the Toronto twosome’s discog.

Listen + buy “Day and Night” on iTunes here. Meanwhile, here’s the video for their similarly timed release, “Something About You”–another single off the upcoming EP, Majid Jordan.

Teyana Taylor Drops “Your Wish”; ‘The Cassette Tape 1994’

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A fan-dedicated, ‘thank-you’ supplementary to her VII studio album [per Def Jam] from last year, The Cassette Tape ’94 is Teyana Taylor’s newest G.O.O.D. Music-sponsored cut, arriving at a low-key juncture in the Harlem R&B singer’s career. It’s poppier than usual; less of the sultry, smoky mystique that enveloped her last, much darker project–and more bright and funky ‘Oooh…On the TLC Tip’ type material. Released [ironically] a day before the anniversary of Aaliyah’s death, it’s no surprise that the five-track mixtape seethes with everything that made the R&B princess irresistible. [Highlights include “Tonight”, “Undercover”].

“Your Wish” is the five-track mixtape’s intro; the epitome of swirling, dance-dazed ’90s R&B. There’s a little Jade to be found, a little Total, and even a kind of SWV-ish ecstasy to the ‘Ye/Domo-produced cut. It sways with dancefloor smoothness, paying a melodic “Back & Forth” homage to the Princess, herself while staying true to Taylor’s own pipes.

Check out the SoundCloud link here:

Fauntleroy Drops Retro Cut, “Magic”

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He’s noted for dropping slick, indie R&B tracks during lulls in the music world; just when we’re craving something new-age, experimental, and succinct…Fauntleroy, a name now fairly synonymous for self-produced, instrumentally sublime, and often heavily dipped in old-soul, delivers.

From “Who Are You“, to “Mid-Air“, and “Running Through Red Lights“, he’s been a maniac all month, dropping singles from above like sustenance amidst a famine. Well, at least that’s what it feels like.

This week it’s “Magic”, amongst others. Fauntleroy creeps in over a kooky, ’60s mod shuffle, a homemade grandma-organ and synth arrangement blended to set the mood for his glossy vocals. With wide-eyed delight, he imagines an assumedly exaggerated [but generationally plausible] scene (“Met this girl on the internet, yeah, now we’re sharing a cigarette/ Don’t know her number or her real name…).

The silly, cyber-imagery continues (“Girl, what’s your screen name?”) until the 2:08 mark, at which time the daydream flickers out. But with all of the track’s tottering danceability, we’d never ask it to end.

Drake & Majid Jordan Drop “My Love”

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Highly active with Zane Lowe interviews, music vids, and the brand-new Apple Music, OVO coworkers dropped a new track, “My Love”, on Friday afternoon via SoundCloud.

Whirling 808s devour the nebulous, submerged track—a dim, deep-house instrumental fashioned by the producer duo. The hook alternated with their tense, tight-lipped interrogation (“Why you wanna be my love?/ Is it just for show?”) and the quintessential, wound-licking Drake chime-in: (“I’m not your trophy, baby/ I won’t let you show me off or shine me up, or line me up, no”…).

Check it out below:

New Track: “Broken Heart Broken Eyes” x James Fauntleroy

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Enduring solo act, occasional producer, and Cocaine 80s frontman, mellow-R&B vocalist James Fauntleroy just previewed some new material. The new desolate single, unashamedly titled “Broken Heart Broken Eyes”, arrived on SoundCloud last night.

In step with Cocaine 80s cake-layer harmonies and the afro-pop collective’s propensity for candlelight piano interludes. This time, Larrance Dopson lends a hand on keyboards, while James mourns via melody. Word-wise, it’s a little more than choked-up…[“If you showed me your heart right now, wouldn’t recognize/ Broken hearts broken eyes too far, since you went and changed on me”.]

Like most of the caramel-voiced crooner’s soft cuts—for those already misty-eyed, it’s designed to keep you that way. 

Check it out below.

New Track: Thundercat x “Them Changes”

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The LA producer/bass proficient just dropped a new track, and it’s confirmed as the prequel to his ‘mini album’-to-be, which arrives next week from the Brainfeeder record label. [Fellow electronic artist Flying Lotus’ 7-year enterprise in the making].

Sonically disoriented, “Them Days” is an unnerving, post-love stumble: one that features Thundercat picking up broken-heart shards over an eery, funk-driven gurgle…(“Now I’m sitting here with a black hole in my chest/ A heartless, broken mess…”).

It’s an inebriated, Parliament-esque shake, with a little more vulnerability and chunky, signature T-Cat bass. The 3-minute track mixes Bruner’s fluid vocals with keyboards from Flying Lotus, sax from Kamasi Washington, and piano by Dennis Hamm—(all who appear in Pitchfork’s live performance here).

Thundercat’s mini-compilation, The Beyond/Where The Giants Roam is due June 22nd. Upon release, it can be purchased here.

Foals Shares “What Went Down” + Music Video

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It’s been two years since the release of Holy Fire: enough time for any pent-up antsiness surrounding the Oxford indie collective’s studio album return to reach its peak. The shoegaze world stirs, and Foals is searing the anticipation.

Complete with corresponding video, the fivesome just dropped “What Went Down” on Tuesday, its first debut a highlight on Annie Mac’s BBC Radio 1 station. As grubby alt-rock as it is hooking, melodic pop—in all of its addictive refrain–the 6-minute track is indulgingly downcast, even for a group that spent their whole breakout album drowning—figuratively via lyrical theme [and literally, on their cover art]…(see: Total Life Forever).

As for the music video, the visuals are aquatically menacing: blurry, blue, and shivering with lead singer Yannis Philippakis’ near-exhausted vocal cries. His words, even when blurted in adoration, resemble an instigating snarl: (“When I see you mad, I see a lion/ You’re the apple of my eye…”).

Intense for the usually ‘gentler’ Foals, “What Went Down” marks both a significant sound divergence and hard-rock, icy emotion unchained.